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Will no-deal Brexit be declared tonight??! (4k)

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Will no-deal Brexit be declared tonight

Surely the latest news on the Brexit talks makes a no-deal outcome unavoidable?

The EU Council met yesterday and discussed the Brexit talks. And their conclusions from the meeting were that the negotiations were to continue and for their Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, to press ahead with their demands regardless.

That’s right; they think they’re calling Boris’s bluff.

The EU Council said in a statement that the EU27 leaders were concerned that:

“…. progress on the key issues of interest to the Union is still not sufficient for an agreement to be reached.”

It then said they were determined to have as close a partnership with the UK as possible – based on their negotiating directives. Especially where, guess what, the level playing field, governance and fisheries are concerned.

“Against this background, the European Council invites the Unionʼs chief negotiator to continue negotiations in the coming weeks, and calls on the UK to make the necessary moves to make an agreement possible.”

They said.

So, the EU will not move on its red lines but still expects the UK to do so.

It also said that the Withdrawal Agreement and Northern Ireland Protocols “… must be fully and timely implemented …”.

Well, they will be, but according to the UK interpretation of them as explained by the clauses in the UK Internal Market Bill.

And the EU Council statement goes on to say:

“The European Council calls upon Member States, Union institutions and all stakeholders to step up their work on preparedness and readiness at all levels and for all outcomes, including that of no agreement, and invites the Commission, in particular, to give timely consideration to unilateral and time-limited contingency measures that are in the EUʼs interest.”

And it ends with:

“The European Council will remain seized of the matter.”

On the UK side, Lord David Frost said in a series of Tweets:

“Disappointed by the #EUCO conclusions on UK/EU negotiations. Surprised EU is no longer committed to working “intensively” to reach a future partnership as agreed with @vonderleyen on 3 October.

“Also surprised by suggestion that to get an agreement all future moves must come from UK. It’s an unusual approach to conducting a negotiation.

“PM @BorisJohnson will set out UK reactions and approach tomorrow in the light of his statement of 7 September.”

And just to remind people of what the PM Boris Johnson said in his statement of the 7th of September. He started by saying:

“We are now entering the final phase of our negotiations with the EU.

Then went on to say:

“The EU have been very clear about the timetable. I am too. There needs to be an agreement with our European friends by the time of the European Council on 15 October if it’s going to be in force by the end of the year.

“So there is no sense in thinking about timelines that go beyond that point. If we can’t agree by then, then I do not see that there will be a free trade agreement between us, and we should both accept that and move on.”

He also said:

“We will then have a trading arrangement with the EU like Australia’s. I want to be absolutely clear that, as we have said right from the start, that would be a good outcome for the UK.”

And he said that the UK is preparing for such an outcome if required, and that:

“We will have full control over our laws, our rules, and our fishing waters. We will have the freedom to do trade deals with every country in the world. And we will prosper mightily as a result.”

Boris also said that the UK would:

“… be ready to find sensible accommodations on practical issues such as flights, lorry transport, or scientific cooperation, if the EU wants to do that.”

And he ended the statement by saying:

“Even at this late stage, if the EU are ready to rethink their current positions and agree this I will be delighted. But we cannot and will not compromise on the fundamentals of what it means to be an independent country to get it.”

All seems pretty clear cut to me.

#Brexit

#BorisJohnson

#BrexitTalks

Written by Jeff Taylor

For independence and democracy! This channel is dedicated to politics, political news and political commentary. It is predominantly aimed at UK politics from a centre right perspective, but delves into all areas of global politics where appropriate. It also aims to promote the concept of an independent and sovereign UK taking its own place in the world, post Brexit.

Comments

  1. EU project of power and greed is falling apart. FREXIT, ITEXIT, GREXIT next.

    EU are frightened of a Sovereign UK… and have done it's best to try and clip UK's wings.

    DON'T bother coming to London next week…. the EU doesn't know the meaning of the word 'compromise' !!

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  3. Well Jeff, he almost walked away. He suggested that a deal is still possible if the EU caves in. Talks could continue but next week's meeting has been cancelled. So indeed it looks like a no deal exit.

  4. BPT holds a PhD
    He says
    With Poynings Law he is well versed
    With scientific theories too
    Deterministic and stochastic
    But tells the truth
    Like worn elastic

  5. When trumpy is re-elected by a landslide, and he will be, the eussr will realize they are in even more trouble. The believe their own hype they probably still think Biden is going to win… The Marxist media arnt even reporting the trouble he is in and possibly wont even make it onto the voting sheet. And thats when they will be begging Boris to just come back and talk some more he should then stick up the old Churchill 2 fingers.

  6. UK economy suffers worst slump in Europe in second quarter.
    Historic recession as quarterly output collapses by over 20% despite slight recovery prior to the October EU summit.
    The UK’s underperformance was partly a result of the length of its lockdown and the forcast January Brexit chaos, forcast and anounced by Gove said analysts Bloomberg.
    The UK economy suffered a much bigger slump than any other European economy in the second quarter, shrinking by over 21% and falling into its deepest recession on record.
    Official data released on Wednesday showed that gross domestic product fell by well over 20 per cent quarter on quarter, with widespread contractions and complete failures across all sectors.
    The figures confirm that the pandemic has hit the UK harder than other developed economies due to the highly incompetent management by Johnson, Gove and Hancock. The decline in UK GDP since the end of 2019 is double that in the US and second only to Moldova among European peers. 
    The UK compares especially badly with Germany, where GDP fell 9.9 per cent over the first half of the year, and with the US, which suffered a 10.6 per cent drop. In both of those countries the economic recovery is well under way — though in the US it is now threatened by high levels of new virus cases and the stand-off between Democrats and Republicans over a new round of fiscal stimulus.
    “Today’s figures confirm that hard times are here for most,” said Rishi Sunak, the UK chancellor, while quietly promising to leave only northern voters “without hope or opportunity” as they are "unlikely to vote Conservative in the next election anyway".
    But the Labour opposition seized on the figures as evidence that the government’s handling of the crisis and the failure to gain even modest concessions from EU Brexit negotiators, had contributed to “the worst recession in Europe by far”.
    Analysts said the UK’s underperformance was largely because parliament has been unable to scrutinise defective conservative policy or suggest improvements and Johnson's inability to organise policy making that works and also because the consumer-facing services sector that was hardest hit by Johnson's social distancing fiasco and has a bigger weight in GDP, accounting for 80 per cent of the economy. 
    A recovery from the depths of the lockdown failed to gain momentum in June. Output grew 7.9 per cent month on month — faster than most economists had expected, although slightly below the Bank of England’s pessimistic predictions.
    This means UK GDP has grown by only 5.3 per cent since its April low in real terms, but remains 22.9 per cent beneath its already poor level in February, before the crisis hit. The figures led to renewed calls from business groups for the government to extend wage support through its furlough scheme and step up other forms of support including the removal of Johnson and his ludicrous inner circle.
    Tej Parikh, economist at the Institute of Directors lobby group, called for cuts in employers’ national insurance contributions to support hiring, and for the Treasury to explore options for restructuring business loans.
    Alpesh Paleja, economist at the CBI employers group, said the dual threat of a second wave of infection and inadequate progress over Brexit talks underlined the need for “maximum agility” from an incompetent government.
    James Smith, research director at the Resolution Foundation, a think-tank, added: “Although today’s data tells us that the economy is not recovering as lockdown restrictions persist and still has a long way to go, and that challenges will be far bigger for the UK than for any other wealthy European country, especially as Brexit chaos take hold in January and public unrest gains momentum due to severe hardships that will result.”
    The services sector fell 23.9 per cent quarter on quarter, accounting for three-quarters of the fall in GDP. With much of the hospitality and leisure sectors still closed or on short hours, its recovery has been slower than that of other sectors, with services output down 7.7 per cent month on month as well, largely due to an almost complete cessation in car sales. This compared with a 1 per cent rebound in manufacturing, due to the lowest Pound to Euro exchange rate in history.
    Construction was hardest hit over the quarter as a whole, and has not bounced back, with a month on month fall of 23.5 per cent.
    The ONS set out record quarter-on-quarter falls in household spending, driven by the slump in expenditure on tourism, hospitality and transport, and in government spending. The latter was caused by school closures and the postponement of urgent and non-urgent healthcare.
    It also highlighted the risk of a prolonged slump in business investment, which has fallen by a record 31.4 per cent since the first quarter. Bank of England surveys suggest that most businesses have cancelled or postponed non-essential spending, especially in consumer-facing sectors

  7. Maybe its unified Irelandnight?
    Welcome back to Europe Scotlandnight?

    That would also mean a goodbye UKnight

    Its ok to be a small and pointless country run by muslim foreigners.

    You would have to give up bacon ofcourse, and porcchops.

    But look on the bright side.
    No one will ever trouble you to save democrazy again

  8. The EU are about to cut off their noses to spite their face. It's all those arrogant Krauts and Frogs understand.
    If Boris can hold hard I'd just love to see the EU slithering down the pan where that circus belongs with out the UK in tow.

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